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Monday, January 29, 2007

Blog Disclosure Statement

I’ve been giving some thought recently to the relationship between bloggers and their readers, in the course of working on an upcoming article, and so I decided it was finally time to post a disclosure statement on my blog.

My goal is for CinemaTech to be a useful, opinionated, and fair source of information about the ways that new technologies are changing the entertainment business. When I receive corrections or amplifications from readers or people I’ve written about in the blog, I’ll include them in the original post. Differing points-of-view are always welcome in the comments area of each post.

I consider myself a full-time journalist and writer, although I am also paid for speaking, moderating, and helping to develop the agenda for conferences and other events. When I’m writing about an event to which I have some sort of financial tie, I’ll make note of that. I don’t work as a consultant. I don’t accept gifts worth more than $50, or hold onto “review products” that I’m sent to evaluate. (I suspect that I’ve been to a few media dinners where the journalists present have ingested more than $50 worth of food and wine, but in those cases, I’ve skipped dessert.)

I do own some stock in individual companies, though none that I cover regularly. If I do mention one of these companies here on CinemaTech or in any other venue, I’ll be sure to note it.

CinemaTech carries advertising from Google; I don’t have control over the advertising or any interaction with the advertisers. Links on CinemaTech that point to books or other products on also generate a small amount of revenue for me. Links here to the book The Future of Web Video or other books I’ve written might also be considered advertisements, since the purchase of these generates a royalty for me.

If you have a comment or question about this policy, please e-mail me: kirsner - at-