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Wednesday, April 26, 2006

`Video Goes Internet' panel...Double-sided DVDs...Mark Cuban's new talk show

I didn't hear a whole lot that was shockingly new at Tuesday night's panel on `Video Goes Internet' in San Francisco... but maybe I've just been going to too many of these panels. (Can you have a panel with `video' in the title and not invite Google Video's Jennifer Feikin?)


Some interesting points:


- Internet video viewers are very engaged with what they watch (moreso than TV viewers), and so advertising appended to Net videos commands a high price.


- Feikin says that the most popular videos tend to be short-form comedy and, surprisingly, self-produced testimonials about products or services.


- Blake Krikorian of Sling Media says that he expects more consumers to engage in 'multi-screen viewing,' watching TV while also pulling up content (related or unrelated) on a laptop.


Renee Blodgett has a much more thorough write-up on her blog. The San Francisco Chronicle's tech blog offers a shorter report.


Also...


Warner Home Video's `Rumor Has It' will be the first double-sided DVD, with standard-definition content on one side, and high-definition content on the other (in the HD-DVD format). It'll be in stores May 9th. I wonder if at some point we'll see double-sided DVDs with HD-DVD on one side, and Blu-ray on the other. No word on how the Kandinsky-esque Kevin Costner flick will be priced... it's inevitably more expensive to produce these double-sided discs, so if they're priced the same as a regular DVD, that means Warner's profit margin is slimmer.


Finally, the Web's most opinionated man, Mark Cuban, will be hosting a once-weekly talk show about "sports, business, and everyday life" starting this summer on Sirius Satellite Radio. My prediction: the first caller will be some budding filmmaker hoping Cuban will finance his project. Second caller: some theater owner (or director M. Night Shyamalan) complaining about Cuban's day-and-date releasing strategy.